THE MY LAI MEMORIAL EXHIBIT

Ask if the Vietnam war was necessary, just and moral. Ask, “Do  we continue to make the same mistakes in our wars today?“ Our wars now cause death, destruction, and floods of refugees, just like in Vietnam. Make amends for the damage Americans caused the Vietnamese people. Renew your commitment to work for peace and social justice in the world today. Explore organizations that are doing remediation work in Vietnam and initiatives working for social justice.

HONOR

… the tragic impact of our political and military actions on the people of Vietnam though our panels on the My Lai Massacre and the Vietnam War. Experience the Vietnamese as a proud and cultured people with long history of resisting foreign domination. A people who in the midst of the American War were wounded, killed and had their villages, their homes, their livelihood and their social fabric torn apart. Learn how our governmental and military policies and practices developed, nurtured, implemented and then covered-up a campaign that led to the killing of 2 million Vietnamese civilians during the course of this war; a military campaign that allowed and encouraged the atrocity at My Lai, and other mass killings on the ground and from the air with bombs and artillery shells.

SHARE YOUR ART

Engage in a unique and powerful artistic process developed by VFP member/ artist Mac MacDevitt. Give voice to your thoughts and feelings by building a sculptural collage, engage in dialogue, and share your artwork and comments with other participants and on social media.

ACT FOR JUSTICE & PEACE

Ask if the Vietnam war was necessary, just and moral. Ask if we continue to make the same mistakes in our wars today. Wars that cause death, destruct, and floods of refugees, just like in Vietnam. Make amends for the damage Americans caused the Vietnamese people. Renew your commitment to work for peace and social justice in the world today. Explore organizations that are doing remediation work in Vietnam and local initiatives working for social justice.

Photo Gallery

Testimonials

PORTLAND, MAINE

“I walked into the exhibit steeling myself — already in tears. I thought I knew about My Lai; I had read everything I could about it when Seymour Hersh’s articles came out. However, as it turned out, I knew very little — or perhaps the passage of time or the simple shock of the horror had made me block out what I had learned. I wasn’t in any way prepared for the emotional impact of what I saw yesterday. How do we, as a nation, ever atone for this?”

IOWA CITY

“The exhibit, it words and images together, scorch my consciousness. The men and women of Veterans for Peace have created a powerful, truth-filled homage to the men, women and children, who suffered at American hands. Thanks to all men and women who resisted and continue to resist. I promise to be more militant for peace.”

SAN FRANCISCO

“An amazing documentation of some of the most horrendous crimes committed on the people of Vietnam… so important for Americans to know this truth so that we can have a foundation to know better how to think, feel and hopefully act in regard to today’s policies of war by the U.S. government. A very important and concise and thoroughly-covered resource for us all. Thank you… may it be seen by many.”

Note from Pulitzer Prize winner Viet Thanh Nguyen read at the opening of the My Lai Memorial Exhibit at Arizona State University in October

As infamous and terrible as the My Lai massacre was, what is worse is that it was not unique. Certainly there were other massacres of Vietnamese civilians by American and South Korean troops, and the Vietnamese of both sides also committed atrocities against each other. The tragedy at My Lai symbolizes what happens when war is unleashed by governments, parties, and revolutions. War cannot be contained by ideals and laws. There is no such thing as collateral damage. The death of civilians and innocents—and the death of innocence itself—is not accidental but built into war. Memorialization is therefore not only about commemorating the dead, but also reminding us that the forces that killed them remain with us and within us.  

News Feed

My Lai Memorial Exhibit Featured At ASU in Phoenix 

My Lai Memorial Exhibit Featured At ASU in Phoenix  In early October the  My Lai Memorial Exhibit was featured in a six-day event involving more than a dozen thoughtful presentations by faculty and Veterans for Peace members at the Downtown Phoenix campus at Arizona State University.  The event was organized by Nancy Dallett in the […]

My Lai Memorial Exhibit Featured At UIC School of Public Health

My Lai Memorial Exhibit Featured At UIC School of Public Health The UIC School of Public Health and the College of Nursing hosted the Memorial Exhibit from September 16 – September 20. Chicago VFP member Gerry Gorman in the School of Nursing partnered with Susan Altfeld, Associate Dean in the School of Public Health to […]

My Lai Memorial Exhibit Featured At Hairpin Arts In Chicago In June

My Lai Memorial Exhibit Featured At Hairpin Arts In Chicago In June The Memorial Exhibit was part of a series of events at Hairpin Arts – “Endless War: Memory,Trauma And Resistance” celebrating the powerful impact of art and activism in a world torn by war and violence featuring visual and performance art, workshops, veteran storytelling, […]

Mountain Lake PBS features the My Lai Memorial Exhibit in Essex, NY

Mountain Lake PBS in Plattsburgh, NY produced a short six-minute video of the My Lai Memorial Exhibit in September as part of their Veterans Coming Home series. In the video Veterans for Peace member Pete Conroy speaks about his experience as a G.I. in Vietnam and the strong impact the Memorial Exhibit had on him […]